Register :: Log in :: Profile   


Sword gurus, does anyone know this company?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Samurai Archives Citadel Forum Index // Arms and Armor
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 4:00 am    Post subject: Sword gurus, does anyone know this company? Reply with quote
http://www.kanshoan.com/english/

My wife has a line on several swords through an affiliate of the company above. Looking at the PDF's on the swords, and the website above (swords she's looking at in the PDF's are NOT on the website, unfortunately), I can't see any obvious "uh-oh's". Any thoughts? I'll post the PDF's as JPEGS soon to get reviews.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
...right....

so since there was no response, I'll just post the pics and text of what I'm looking at. Sword gurus, give me some pointers.

Quote:
Era: End of the Muromachi Era (late 16th century)
Length: 43.9cm
Curve: 0.9cm
Mekugi hole: 2
Accessories: Shirasaya (Plain wood sheath only)
Certification: Hozon Token (a certification of rank issued by the Society for the Preservation of Japanese Art Swords)
This Society is a Japanese sword research institute that operates under the jurisdiction of the Agency for Cultural Affairs.
Engravings: Front — bonji / so-ken / tsume (Bonji (Sanskrit): kaanman = Cetaka)
Back — bonji / gomabashi / tsume (Bonji (Sanskrit): kaan = Cetaka)
* The engravings on both sides each refer to the Buddhist deity Cetaka, but usually a combination of
engravings are used to refer to Cetaka (Fudo Myo-O in Japanese).
Fudo Myo-o is the best known of the Myō-ō, who are venerated especially by the Shingon sect of Japanese Esoteric Buddhism (Japan's version of
Mahayana Buddhism). Myo-o is the Japanese term for Sanskrit "Vidyaraja," a group of warlike and wrathful deities known in English as the Mantra
Kings, the Wisdom Kings, or the Knowledge Kings.
Fudō Myo-o converts anger into salvation. He has a furious, glaring face, as he seeks to frighten people into accepting the teachings of Dainichi
Buddha and he a carries “kurikara” or devil-subduing sword in his right hand (representing wisdom cutting through ignorance) and a rope in his left
hand (to catch and bind up demons). Fudō is also worshipped as a deity who can bring monetary fortune. Fudō’s aureole is typically the flames
of fire, which according to Buddhist lore, represent the purification of the mind by the burning away of all material desires.
This sword is a typical hira-zukuri wakizashi (short sword) from the late Muromachi Era. Upon entering the Edo Era, the design of wakizashi
changed to shinogi-zukuri, making them the same as standard katana.
Since this katana was polished sometime in the Meiji Era, there are a few traces of minor cracking on the surface of the blade, but this in no way
affects the value, condition or esthetic merit of the sword.
This katana has a beautiful form and is an excellent example for its time period. The length and width of the katana, the depth of the curvature,
and the balance of the kissaki (the part of the blade that tapers to the tip) are all of extremely high quality. The temperline is a type known as
notare (wave), which exhibits a gentle arc.





_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote







Quote:

Sukemitsu (Wakizashi)
$6,200
Item number: 10W0504_04P
Sukemitsu: Sukemitsu was a renowned swordsmith who lived in Bizen Province in what is now Okayama Prefecture one generation before
Katsumitsu.
The Sukemitsu School continued for a few generations, and all of its swords are highly regarded. The workshop was one of the
foremost of Bizen in the mid-Muromachi Era.
Era: Mid-Muromachi Era (late 16th century)
Length: 45.5cm
Curve: 1.4cm
Mekugi hole: 2
Accessory: Shirasaya
Certification: Hozon Token (a certification of rank issued by the Society for the Preservation of Japanese Art Swords)
This Society is a Japanese sword research institute that operates under the jurisdiction of the Agency for Cultural Affairs.
This sword is signed by the mid-Muromachi Era swordsmith Bizen Osafune Sukemitsu.
While the sword is slightly shorter than usual, it possesses a curvature called sakizori that is unique to this era.
The front of the sword is etched with a groove called a hi, but the exact reason for carving hi into swords is not known. There are several theories
on why the hi exist including: the hi was carved to make the sword lighter, it served as a groove to let blood drain off the sword easily, or it was
design feature to make the sword swing straighter in accordance with the principles of fluid dynamics.
The koshirae (mounting) is a standard Edo Era wakizashi-koshirae.
The tsuba (sword guard) is decorated with a figure of a crane, ornamentation (metal pieces hidden under the yarn pattern in the middle of the
handle) and a figure of a tortoise. With the crane and the tortoise, which both represent longevity, and decorations fashioned with auspicious
metals, this koshirae is a truly propitious piece of work.
Katana such as this one with metalwork based on a certain motif were expensive even in the Edo Era, so it is thought that this sword belonged to
a relatively high-ranking warrior.
This is a typical wakizashi from the mid-Muromachi Era with a koshirae mounting featuring auspicious crane and tortoise metalwork.
Even by themselves, these are superior quality pieces that anyone is sure to enjoy.

_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Taira no Sadamori (Katana)
$5,250
Item number: 10K0504_02P
Sadamori: Taira Sadamori. This katana was crafted in what is now Takada in Oita Prefecture by the blacksmith Sadamori.
Starting in the Muromachi Era, swordsmithing grew into a major industry in Takada. Katana made here are called Taira Tadaka or
Takadamono.
Era: End of the Muromachi Era (late 16th century)
Length: 64.9cm
Curve: 0.9cm
Mekugi hole: 2
Accessories: Handachi koshirae (hybrid mounting)
Certification: Hozon Token (a certification of rank issued by the Society for the Preservation of Japanese Art Swords)
This Society is a Japanese sword research institute that operates under the jurisdiction of the Agency for Cultural Affairs.
This excellent sword was crafted by swordsmith Sadamori who was one of the most renowned smiths of Takada (Oita Prefecture).
Crafted in the late Muromachi Era, this katana differs from the standard form created during this era. The design of this particular katana is known
as nagamaki-naoshi. Essentially, it is a katana fashioned from a nagamaki, a long weapon which was originally over 3 shaku in length (90 cm).
Nagamaki (literally, “long wrapping”) were called as such because they were made by attaching a chosun (long katana) hilt to a blade and were
swung in a wide, sickle-like pattern. In later eras, nagamaki were shortened to the size of katana, like this specimen, and they are known as
nagamaki-naoshi.
This type of sword design all but disappeared after the Edo Era.
This sword appears to have been polished sometime during the Meiji Era, but it remains in excellent condition.
The koshirae (mounting) is called a handachi koshirae, and its blend of katana and long sword elements was popular at the end of the Edo Era.
Portions of the sheath have been repaired, albeit not too well, but the piece does not possess any major defects. The body of the sword and the
mounting together constitute a rare specimen.






_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Quote:
Daido (Katana)
$9,000
Item number: 10K0504_05P
Mikawa no kami Fujiwara DAIDO Nobunao
Mikawa no kami: This is a zuryo-mei, or honorary title bestowed by the imperial court.
Fujiwara = Derived from one of the major traditional Japanese surnames, Fujiwara was a name taken by several swordsmiths.
Also known as the Mononobe, a clan responsible for administering weapons.
Daido = Swordsmith’s signature. The correct reading for this name is Omichi, but the name is read Daido by convention.
Nobunao = Given name
Era: Late Muromachi Era (late 16th century)
Length: 73.7cm
Curve: 2cm
Mekugi hole: 4
Accessory: Kin-nashiji-saya uchigatana koshirae
Certification: Hozon Token (a certification of rank issued by the Society for the Preservation of Japanese Art Swords)
This Society is a Japanese sword research institute that operates under the jurisdiction of the Agency for Cultural Affairs.
This is a katana from the end of the Muromachi Era. Daido was a swordsmith from Mino in present-day Gifu Prefecture.
The original sword is thought to have been an extremely long katana, measuring 3 shaku (=90 cm).
Sword measurements from the end of the Muromachi tended to be much longer than those of the mid-Muromachi Era, and sword widths also
grew more robust. Upon entering the Edo Era, swords were shortened, using a process called suriage, to meet the measurements set by the Edo
Shogunate: 2 shaku, 3 sun and 5 bu (= approx. 71.6 cm).
There is no major damage or warping on the surface. Even after 50 years this sword remains in pristine condition.
The koshirae (mounting) is a gold pear skin finish uchigatana (mid-length sword) koshirae. Gold pear skin finish is a lacquering process in which
lacquer is mixed with gold leaf. It is worth noting that the uchigatana koshirae is a standard design for sword mountings.
The handle is bound in leather rather than with yarn and the tsuba (sword guard) is decorated with a dragonfly motif. The dragonfly, called
kachimushi (“victory bugs”), was revered by the Japanese warrior since it always flies forward and never retreats.
This long katana with its gold pear skin finish uchigatana koshirae makes a powerful statement and is an exquisite piece.









_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
lordameth
Awa no Kami
Awa no Kami
Veteran Member
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1821
Location: 南加州

PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 1:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'm no sword expert, so I apologize to invade this thread. But I just felt the need to comment on how beautiful these pictures are. I hope it might turn out that any of these are real...
_________________
My blog on Japanese art & history: http://chaari.wordpress.com

紫水晶殿 - The Amethyst Lord
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 4:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Thanks--I guess I should have named this thread "ooh, cool pics of swords, come look!" Laughing

I'm clueless when it comes to merits of swords, hence posting them here. But they all look pretty.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
estcrh
Artisan
Artisan
Veteran Member



Joined: 20 Dec 2009
Posts: 103

PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
ltdomer98 wrote:
Thanks--I guess I should have named this thread "ooh, cool pics of swords, come look!" Laughing

I'm clueless when it comes to merits of swords, hence posting them here. But they all look pretty.
Ask your question here and you will receive a better response http://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/index.php
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
JLBadgley
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei



Joined: 09 Apr 2007
Posts: 1617
Location: Washington, DC, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Everything looks legit, from what I can see. The pictures are typical for some place like this (check out Aoi Art for a comparison).

You can also check with Sword Forum International for a more sword-specific perspective.

-Josh
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Ranger
Ashigaru
Ashigaru
Veteran Member



Joined: 18 May 2006
Posts: 355
Location: Hawaii

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 2:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

_________________
You may be whatever you resolve to be.
- Stonewall Jackson
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 5:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Ranger wrote:
Being in Dirkadirkastan, I know you have some coin saved up. If you are considering getting a sword, I would resist the temptation long enough until you’ve explored the market a bit and developed a feel of what qualities to look for in a sword. There are many reputable dealers out there and with the world economy being what it is, you can find a real gem at a reasonable price if you are patient.


I've been checking out the link, lots of good stuff.

Yes, that tax-free money is burning a hole in my pocket. I'm buying a suit of armor for display, and kind of felt it was silly to have the armor with no sword. Is it possible to just get a Koshigae for display purposes? I do want to do it right, and not rush into buying the actual sword, but want something to have on display with my gusoku.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
estcrh
Artisan
Artisan
Veteran Member



Joined: 20 Dec 2009
Posts: 103

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
ltdomer98 wrote:
Ranger wrote:
Being in Dirkadirkastan, I know you have some coin saved up. If you are considering getting a sword, I would resist the temptation long enough until you’ve explored the market a bit and developed a feel of what qualities to look for in a sword. There are many reputable dealers out there and with the world economy being what it is, you can find a real gem at a reasonable price if you are patient.


I've been checking out the link, lots of good stuff.

Yes, that tax-free money is burning a hole in my pocket. I'm buying a suit of armor for display, and kind of felt it was silly to have the armor with no sword. Is it possible to just get a Koshigae for display purposes? I do want to do it right, and not rush into buying the actual sword, but want something to have on display with my gusoku.
Are you looking for a real nihonto or just something that will be a good replica. You can frequently buy a oil quenched ww2 sword in civilian fittings which would do the job, look like a nihonto and still be in a good price range.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
estcrh wrote:
Are you looking for a real nihonto or just something that will be a good replica. You can frequently buy a oil quenched ww2 sword in civilian fittings which would do the job, look like a nihonto and still be in a good price range.


When I buy, I want to buy the real thing. The swords above are from the time period I'm interested in. A WWII gunto wouldn't do at all.

I'm not concerned with the cost--I'm concerned with the value. On the one hand, I want to know I'm paying $9000 for the Daido, for instance, and to know that I'm getting $9000 worth of value out of it. I'm not interested in collecting, per se, or, as the FAQ says, getting entry level pieces in order to trade up and get better pieces in the future. I want to buy the right thing the first time.

I think you're confusing my comment above; I should clarify. I have a 4 year old son. 4 year olds find ways to get their hands on anything they can. A sword in the hands of a 4 year old, however he got it, would be disastrous. I *want* the real thing; however, the actual SWORD will be kept locked up, in a shirasaya, away from any temptations, to be taken out in adult company for those who would appreciate it. The koshirae, with the wooden filler inside, would be perfect to use as a display piece with my suit of armor; however, it's not just to have something pretty to put in the corner with the gusoku. While I'd be furious with him if he was playing with the koshirae, at least I don't have the concern of him slicing off his or someone else's hand.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
JLBadgley
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei



Joined: 09 Apr 2007
Posts: 1617
Location: Washington, DC, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2010 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Koshirae are often displayed without the sword, and you can get find sets or as pieces and have the koshirae put together (presumably on a sword). A simple piece of bamboo can be inserted in the tsuka to keep it in the saya for display purposes.

-Josh
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Ranger
Ashigaru
Ashigaru
Veteran Member



Joined: 18 May 2006
Posts: 355
Location: Hawaii

PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
ltdomer98 wrote:
I *want* the real thing; however, the actual SWORD will be kept locked up, in a shirasaya, away from any temptations, to be taken out in adult company for those who would appreciate it.

That's a smart move here in Hawaii. Keeping it secured away from young children is wise, but rare items like a japanese sword become easy targets for thieves and meth heads. Home invasions are common on Oahu. In fact I participated in a local briefing with the HPD last night discussing recent trends and criminal activity in the Mililani area. When I was a young Captain, I had my home broken into twice (and I was living in nice neighborhood). The thief, a meth head of Japanese decent, broke into my home cleaned out my CD collection (250 CDs), and AV equipment. He even was going to take my samurai swords until he realized they were fake. He left them by the door. I guess even crack heads know junk when they see it.

For my gusoku's, I left them in the mainland with my parents until I can secure them properly. For my swords, I bought a gun safe to secure them.
_________________
You may be whatever you resolve to be.
- Stonewall Jackson
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tsubame1
Hida no Kami
Hida no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1370
Location: Magenta, Northern Italy

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2010 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Paul, would you recommend the Daido ? I've some bad feeling about the look of the hada,not to talk about the nakago that might have been welded on to increase the value... We don't know when the papers were made. I fear old green papers.

Domer, as a thumb of rule late Muromachi and Takada swords aren't very sought after cause their quality in front of other options. With the due exceptions of course.

If I was in your shoes I would retain the money until a good state-of-mind, knowledge and taste are well established. The first rule in purchasing NihonTo is to avoid the hurge to buy. There will always be another sword for you.
_________________
.
Carlo

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Ranger
Ashigaru
Ashigaru
Veteran Member



Joined: 18 May 2006
Posts: 355
Location: Hawaii

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Tsubame1 wrote:
Paul, would you recommend the Daido ? I've some bad feeling about the look of the hada,not to talk about the nakago that might have been welded on to increase the value... We don't know when the papers were made. I fear old green papers.

Carlo, I agree about the Daido. The hada looks tired. I also had the same thought about the nakago looking welded/reconnected back together. Even if it wasn’t, I think it looks ugly and that alone would be a deal breaker for me. At $9000, there are MUCH better swords available. Hopefully Domer stayed far away from this one.

In similar price range, Aoi Art just placed on auction today an NBTHK Tokubetsu Hozon katana (27.91 inch blade, late Kamakura period to Nanbokucho period) for 1,000,000 yen. Blade looks healthy (nice flowing hamon and chikei) with a nice shape. Beautiful!

https://www.aoi-art.com/auction/en/auction.cgi?acc=disp&no=1276735440&t=1213703271
_________________
You may be whatever you resolve to be.
- Stonewall Jackson
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tsubame1
Hida no Kami
Hida no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1370
Location: Magenta, Northern Italy

PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Nice one.

Presently, I'm drolling on this one :

http://www.aoi-art.com/sword/sale/10209.html
_________________
.
Carlo

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Yes, I haven't bought anything yet. I got the answer I was looking for--wait. Thanks for the help, guys--especially since the Daido really looked sexy to me.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Tsubame1
Hida no Kami
Hida no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1370
Location: Magenta, Northern Italy

PostPosted: Sat Jun 19, 2010 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Domer, on due time the Aoi-Art (http://www.aoi-art.com/index.html) will be a good place to buy from. Always ask anything you want to know before to place the order. They'll reply you and so far they've been honest.
Lurking Nihonto Message Board might be a good learning experience even if just now it's going a little downhill.
John (Shinnosen) is a moderator there so feel free to ask about specific swords you're interested in. You'll be safe. Just let me know your eventual nickname/registration name.
_________________
.
Carlo

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Ranger
Ashigaru
Ashigaru
Veteran Member



Joined: 18 May 2006
Posts: 355
Location: Hawaii

PostPosted: Sat Jun 19, 2010 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I visited Aoi Art several years ago while walking to the NBTHK Sword Museum. I have also bought on occasion a few things from them online. I don't know if things have changed much since my visit, but the store was a bit underwhelming and not impressive at all. It's nothing compared to some of the other places in Tokyo. Also, the people in the store were a bit rude and ignored me the entire time I was there. It was their loss though. I was prepared to drop 15k on a sword that I liked, but I resented the fact that they probably assumed I was just another dumb gaigin not worth a few seconds of their time.

Aside from that one experience however, their prices seem competitive and fair. My online transactions with them have been very good.
_________________
You may be whatever you resolve to be.
- Stonewall Jackson
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tsubame1
Hida no Kami
Hida no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1370
Location: Magenta, Northern Italy

PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2010 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Hi Paul, maybe you've missed the right person on due time or simply they had a bad day.

BTW Domer, I wish I had staied shut instead to suggest you to go there:

http://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=7832
_________________
.
Carlo

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
JLBadgley
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei



Joined: 09 Apr 2007
Posts: 1617
Location: Washington, DC, USA

PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2010 2:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I have to concur that Aoi Art was wonderful to me when I showed up, though I usually visit them online. Still, they were once able to deliver something to my hotel the day I arrived in Japan, and when I came by to poke my head in their store they were very friendly.

-Josh
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Samurai Archives Citadel Forum Index // Arms and Armor All times are GMT - 10 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Help the Samurai Archives




alexisRed v1.2 // Theme Created By: Andrew Charron // Samuraized By: Aaron Rister

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group