Register :: Log in :: Profile   


Atsu-hime's route to Edo clarified

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Samurai Archives Citadel Forum Index // The Bakumatsu to Meiji
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Bethetsu
Oki no Kami
Oki no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 14 May 2006
Posts: 1376
Location: Center of Musashi

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 4:56 pm    Post subject: Atsu-hime's route to Edo clarified Reply with quote
According to the 9 pm NHK news last night (the 11th), the route Atsu-hime took from Satsuma to Osaka has been clarified. It was not known whether she went by land or by sea; the Taiga Drama has her going by sea. However, recently read records of a honjin, an inn qualified to receive daimyo, in Okayama prefecture have an entry stating that the hime-sama from Satsuma spent the night there. It has a record of food given her, including sweets, which she apparently shared with all of her retinue. Satsuma clearly went all out to make the procession befitting both her present and future position.

One very interesting point is that the inn records state that their guest was destined to "enter the West Area (Nishi no Maru) [of Edo Castle]", that is, marry the shogun. Many historians assumed the matter was kept secret until later, but apparently not. Based on this new evidence, it is speculated that Nariakira let the marriage plans be widely known so as to make it harder for the shogunate to back off.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Obenjo Kusanosuke
Kii no Kami
Kii no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 16 Dec 2006
Posts: 4554
Location: Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Yes! Very good, Bethetsu. Very Happy

I got the low-down on this news this morning and was going to post about it over the weekend. This is an extremely interesting find. If I heard right, the room charge per night fee that was paid, if it was converted into modern money, would be 400,000 yen per night. At today's exchange rate, that's about US$4,300. I’ll have to double check on this later when I have more time.

Everybody just assumed Atsuhime traveled on a steamship as Shimazu Nariakira, daimyo of Satsuma and her adopted father, purchased a steamer for the han, making Satsuma one of the first han in Japan to adopt this technology. Atsuhime also supposedly bought 100 pieces of a particular type of sweet that she was fond of for her retinue.

In the latest Monumenta Nipponica, the interview with two of Atsuhime’s attendants mention that she was afraid of steamers and when Iemochi headed off to the Kansai area to ‘supervise’ the second campaign against Chōshū, as his ‘mother’, she urged the young shogun not to travel on one, fearing for his safety. Too bad he died anyway.
_________________

Heee heee! Shita iro! Shita iro! Here comes his lordship, Baka Tono!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rekishinotabi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
JLBadgley
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei



Joined: 09 Apr 2007
Posts: 1617
Location: Washington, DC, USA

PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2008 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Interesting stuff. It is always good to see stuff like this coming to light, as it confirms we are still finding out more and more about the past. I just wonder how many more seemingly "unimportant" documents are lying around out there.

Keep it coming!

-Josh
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Obenjo Kusanosuke
Kii no Kami
Kii no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 16 Dec 2006
Posts: 4554
Location: Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2008 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
While looking for some more news about Atshuhime's travel route, I came across this press release from the Smithsonian in Washington, DC. They just discovered a mere couple of months ago that they were in possession of her palanquin. This was an amazing find and good detective work on the part of Saitoh Shinichi from the Edo-Tokyo Museum.

The Princess Atsuhime’s Wedding Palanquin Revealed in the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
October 30, 2008


A recent finding by Shin’ichi Saitoh, a curator at the Tokyo Metropolitan Edo-Tokyo Museum, determined the identity of the original owner of a Japanese ceremonial palanquin in the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Saitoh’s research confirmed that the palanquin was created in 1856 for the wedding procession of the princess Atsuhime, to Tokugawa Iesada (1824-5Cool, the 13th shogun of the Tokugawa family, who ruled from 1603-1867. Atsuhime’s life story is the focus of a novel by Tomiko Miyao, “Tenshoin Atsuhime,” and is currently the spotlight of a 50-episode drama series airing on the Japanese network NHK.

The first international showing of the Sackler’s palanquin will be at the Tokyo Metropolitan Edo-Tokyo Museum, Dec. 16 through Feb. 1, 2009, for its special exhibition on palanquins in Edo organized by Saitoh. The palanquin returns to the Sackler in the spring of 2009, during the National Cherry Blossom Festival, March 28 - April 12, 2009. It will be on view in the exhibition, “A Shogun’s Wedding: The Princess Atsuhime’s Palanquin,” from March 21 - April 9, 2009.

The Sackler palanquin is an example of a “norimono,” a type of conveyance carried by bearers. Ann Yonemura, curator of Japanese Art at the Freer and Sackler galleries, discovered the palanquin in a Sotheby’s London auction in 1984 and identified the palanquin’s elite origin through its circular family crests. Research led her to believe that the palanquin was commissioned for the bride of a top-ranking descendant of the Tokugawa shogun’s family. Noting the importance of the palanquin, the Sackler Gallery acquired the piece in 1985, before the gallery’s opening in 1987. Yonemura’s research was published in “Art and Authority: A Tokugawa Palanquin” in the museum’s journal, Asian Art (1989), and the palanquin was highlighted in two exhibitions at the Sackler Gallery in 1988-89 and again in 1996.

Upon acquisition, the Sackler Gallery’s conservation department began cleaning and treating the palanquin’s sumptuous exterior and interior. Each fitting and painting was removed, treated and returned to its original position. Gilt-copper fittings serve as supports for carrying the 15-foot beam, hinges, handles and other ornamental reinforcements along the framework. The palanquin’s wood exterior is coated in black lacquer and lavishly decorated in gold “maki-e,” a Japanese technique where gold is sprinkled onto wet lacquer in patterns. In contrast to the bold exterior, the interior is a private space, like a miniature palace room, intended primarily for the bride’s appreciation. Paintings on gold-leafed paper also embellish the interior walls. Three paintings depict scenes from the Japanese literary classic, “The Tale of Genji,” written in the 11th century by a noblewoman like the bride herself. The rear panel is a painting replete with auspicious symbols of longevity such as pines, cranes and tortoises.

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, located at 1050 Independence Avenue S.W., and the adjacent Freer Gallery of Art, located at 12th Street and Independence Avenue S.W., are on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. every day, except Dec. 25, and admission is free. The galleries are located near the Smithsonian Metrorail station on the National Mall. For more information about the Freer and Sackler galleries, the public is welcome to visit www.asia.si.edu. For general Smithsonian information, the public may call (202) 633-1000.
_________________

Heee heee! Shita iro! Shita iro! Here comes his lordship, Baka Tono!
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rekishinotabi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Bethetsu
Oki no Kami
Oki no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 14 May 2006
Posts: 1376
Location: Center of Musashi

PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2008 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Obenjo Kusanosuke wrote:

The Sackler palanquin is an example of a “norimono,” a type of conveyance carried by bearers. Ann Yonemura, curator of Japanese Art at the Freer and Sackler galleries, discovered the palanquin in a Sotheby’s London auction in 1984 and identified the palanquin’s elite origin through its circular family crests. Research led her to believe that the palanquin was commissioned for the bride of a top-ranking descendant of the Tokugawa shogun’s family.

I wonder what crest was is the norimono--the Tokugawa or the Konoe.

Edit: The J-Wiki mentions the discovery of the norimono. According to it there were three crests--her personal crest, which was an arabesque of the two-leaved ivy, the peony crest of the Konoe house she was adopted into, and the Tokugawa crest.
平成20年、東京学芸大学の教授により篤姫の駕籠が発見された。場所はアメリカ、スミソニアン博物館。その駕籠には、篤姫だけが使用したとされる「双葉葵唐草」の模様と篤姫の実家である近衛家の家紋「近衛牡丹」紋および「三つ葉葵」紋が散りばめられている

By the way, in the museum link, the final period should not be within the link. The correct link is www.asia.si.edu.


Last edited by Bethetsu on Mon Dec 15, 2008 7:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JLBadgley
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei



Joined: 09 Apr 2007
Posts: 1617
Location: Washington, DC, USA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2008 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Actually, I'm probably going by the Freer-Sackler on Friday. I used to love the library... hard to access from Bangkok, unfortunately, and I don't have as much free time as I used to. For anyone around DC, though, it is an excellent resource for Asian books, and their catalog is online.

Definitely one of my favorite museums around here.


-Josh, currently in VA
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
lordameth
Awa no Kami
Awa no Kami
Veteran Member
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 14 Jun 2007
Posts: 1821
Location: 南加州

PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
The palanquin depicts both the Konoe and Tokugawa crests, which is a large part of what helped scholars finally identify it.

If anyone is interested in seeing my pictures of the palanquin (I apologize, some came out kind of blurry): http://www.flickr.com/photos/toranosuke/tags/atsuhime/
_________________
My blog on Japanese art & history: http://chaari.wordpress.com

紫水晶殿 - The Amethyst Lord
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Owarikenshi
Sandal Bearer
Sandal Bearer
Veteran Member
2010 Benefactor
2010 Benefactor



Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Posts: 256

PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 4:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
VERY cool--Thanks so much for this!

Owarikenshi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Samurai Archives Citadel Forum Index // The Bakumatsu to Meiji All times are GMT - 10 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Help the Samurai Archives




alexisRed v1.2 // Theme Created By: Andrew Charron // Samuraized By: Aaron Rister

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group