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Videos of Talks at Sophia Univ.

 
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lordameth
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2013 11:53 am    Post subject: Videos of Talks at Sophia Univ. Reply with quote
Prof Roberts has just pointed me to a series of videos of talks presented by himself and two other scholars this past October at Sophia University in Tokyo, on the subject "Networks in Premodern and Early Modern Japan."

http://ocw.cc.sophia.ac.jp/121020comparativeculture

Description below:

Quote:
・Rieko Kamei-Dyche (University of Southern California/Hitotsubashi University):
"Marriage Strategies and Familial Networks of the Saionji"
While conventional treatments of medieval Japan that privilege warrior narratives have been slowly augmented by scholarship revealing the continuing role of the court, the vibrant court culture and the roles played by courtier families remain underdeveloped in the literature. A fascinating case study is offered by the Saionji, a notable courtier family that developed extensive connections with both court and bakufu and commanded great wealth and influence. One of the reasons for Saionji prominence was their great skill at generating and wisely investing social capital, especially in building family relations with the major power holders of the time. Through examining these family networks, how they were developed and what benefits they brought the family, an unexplored side of medieval Japanese society comes to light.

・Alexander Vesey (Meiji Gakuin University):
"Forging Karmic Ties: Buddhist temple networking in Early Modern Japan"
Working from a social historical perspective, this paper examines the processes that contributed to the expansion of Kanto area Buddhist temple networks during the 17th and early 18th centuries. Given the emphasis of "founders, " "lineages" and "schools" in popular histories of Japanese Buddhism, the internal coherence of Buddhist institutions seems a given. Local records, however, reveal a different reality as temple networks were also forged by negotiation, and at times hard-fought litigation. This presentation will use several case studies to consider the motives and methods that drove early modern Buddhist networking.

・Luke Roberts (UC Santa Barbara):
Tosa’s Foreign Ties during Edo Period “Isolation”
Despite prohibitions of direct foreign contact during most of the Edo period, people of the domain of Tosa had many connections with and experiences of meeting with people from outside of Japan that linked them to informational networks spanning the world. This talk will center on the experiences of many foreign shipwrecks landing on the coast of Tosa and also discuss other connections to give a sense of Tosa domain’s ties to the world during this most unlikely time of “isolation.”

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Hosokawa Gracia
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2013 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Lordameth,

I chose Luke Roberts presentation on Tosa's Foreign Ties during Edo Period "Isolation" at my alma mater.

Tosa's network with Russia, the Ryukyu Islands and China was amazing! It makes me wonder if a famous Tosa samurai in the pre-Meiji would have been unafraid of foreign ships because of the known history of Tosa men like Mori Yoshiki. Was that a reason to study navigation with Katsu Kaishu?

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lordameth
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 03, 2013 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I wonder! I don't know much about Bakumatsu/Meiji.

I'm pretty curious, actually, how Mori Yoshiki and his contemporaries, themselves, regarded such things, if they were indeed so common despite the official restrictions on maritime travel (i.e. and restrictions on foreigners coming to Tosa otherwise).
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Obenjo Kusanosuke
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 2:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
If the Tosa daimyo and top level han officials, scholars, elite samurai or merchants with close ties to the Yamauchi were having secret liaisons with foreign visitors without overt knowledge of bakufu officials, you can bet great care was taken to keep things hush-hush. It is therefore safe to assume that the goshi level samurai, such as the Sakamoto family, had little to no knowledge of Tosa's foreign dealings. Ryoma's posse was overwhelmingly composed of other goshi or sons of mid to low-level merchants or village headmen.
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Obenjo Kusanosuke wrote:
If the Tosa daimyo and top level han officials, scholars, elite samurai or merchants with close ties to the Yamauchi were having secret liaisons with foreign visitors without overt knowledge of bakufu officials, you can bet great care was taken to keep things hush-hush. It is therefore safe to assume that the goshi level samurai, such as the Sakamoto family, had little to no knowledge of Tosa's foreign dealings. Ryoma's posse was overwhelmingly composed of other goshi or sons of mid to low-level merchants or village headmen.


That sounds reasonable!

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