Register :: Log in :: Profile   


Winners of the 2007 Samurai Fiction Contest
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Samurai Archives Citadel Forum Index // Oshirase
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
heron
萩守
Veteran Member
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 27 Jan 2007
Posts: 1136
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2007 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Well, congratulations. The other story was interesting too - just not quite there with the language. But I thought it was a good way to describe the battle. Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2007 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
heron wrote:
Well, congratulations. The other story was interesting too - just not quite there with the language. But I thought it was a good way to describe the battle. Very Happy


As I said, it started out as something completely different. The original concept was the thoughts of Mitsuhide right before he died, but I couldn't think of a way to really pull it off. I had fun with it, but it could have used a rewrite or three.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
maikeruart
Shushou
Shushou
Veteran Member
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 07 May 2006
Posts: 870
Location: Southbridge

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 2:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
ltdomer98 wrote:
In all honesty, I thought I was done for when I read the latin titled one. The writing style was absolutely captivating to me--I loved it.

I really liked my concept in "Running", but simply didn't pull it off like I had hoped. It started out as about 3 other stories before ending up as it did, and probably would have changed more had I not been writing it at midnight the day of the deadline.


Train of thought stories are a complete b*&ch. I had to do a two page one in college, it ended up being about a guy pushed down the stairs.

Maikeru
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
maikeruart
Shushou
Shushou
Veteran Member
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 07 May 2006
Posts: 870
Location: Southbridge

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
ltdomer98 wrote:
The comment I'll make, having judged the past two years, is that this year there's not one story that made me go "oh lord, why did someone submit this crap? Who was stupid enough to write this?" That certainly happened the past two years. Across the board, the level this year is the highest so far. The last two years, you could easily divide things into "these are worth considering, and these aren't worth a second read, and these....are putrid." This year, all of them were actual contenders. I probably wouldn't have voted for my own stories.


I hope my stories fit category A:
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Wave Tossed
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1698
Location: Columbia, Maryland U.S.A.

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 2:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
JLBadgley wrote:
AngusH wrote:
I've read Intruder and The Matsudaira Plot so far, both very well done.


I'm glad I'm not the only one who read those two first--and I enjoyed both of them. Wave Tossed--you aren't a "Kaze Makase Tsukikage Ran" fan are you?

And "Intruder" was great. I started off thinking "Eh... more ninja stuff, sigh." but kept reading because of the high rating... wonderful!

-Josh
Tsukikage Ran RULES!!!!! Laughing Just Kidding


_________________
"Walk the thousand mile road, step by step" -- Miyamoto Musashi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
maikeruart
Shushou
Shushou
Veteran Member
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 07 May 2006
Posts: 870
Location: Southbridge

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 3:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I liked The Matsudaira Plot. I thought if you played off the cultural perception of woman (towards the swordswoman) that could have added both a hint of humor and excitement.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
kitsuno
Forum Shogun
Forum Shogun



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 9481
Location: Honolulu, HI

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
So I emailed the author of "Magni Nominis Umbra" and asked what resources he used to write the story. He emailed me back, so if anyone was curious:

Quote:
The idea came from H.P.Lovecraft, and I wrote using "The Philosophy of Style", by Herbert Spencer to get the language right. The Dr. was loosely based on Ernest Satow. Here's other stuff I looked at:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/shi/ainu/index.htm
http://anglicanhistory.org/asia/jp/batchelor/yezo1902/
Darwin... Germ Theory...
Japanologists from Wikipedia...
Meiji Restoration from Wikipedia
Legendary creatures...
Matsumae Takahiro from Samurai Archives wiki
http://www.samurai-archives.com/snj.html
http://www.samurai-archives.com/tme.html
http://www.samurai-archives.com/kak.html
http://www.samurai-archives.com/mds.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Ernest_Satow
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meiji_Restoration
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germ_theory_of_disease
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ainu_people
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agostino_Bassi
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beauveria_bassiana
OK... This isn't all of them, but I'm tired of pasting links.
Also "The British Role in the Meiji Restoration" by Gordon Daniels.


I passed along some general feedback, and he has decided to re-write the whole thing as a historical piece, rather than a "horror" piece. Should be interesting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
nagaeyari
Asuka no Kami
Asuka no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 2354
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
A great work of historical fiction. I look forward to reading his revamped story.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AngusH
Castle Guard
Castle Guard
Veteran Member



Joined: 07 May 2006
Posts: 377
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I just finished reading Magni Nominis Umbra and yup, I definately see the Lovecraft influence. Reminded me a little of Lovecraft's 'Case of Charles Dexter Ward', which is one of my favourites by him.
_________________
"While he hears Masashige alone still lives, let him believe that he will prevail at last!"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wave Tossed
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1698
Location: Columbia, Maryland U.S.A.

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
maikeruart wrote:
I liked The Matsudaira Plot. I thought if you played off the cultural perception of woman (towards the swordswoman) that could have added both a hint of humor and excitement.
I tried to put a few references in my story -- not only concerning Edo-period attitudes about women, but also some of the attitudes about women that come from 1950s/1960s and modern Chambara-Land. If I see another reference about "women's happiness" I'm going to puke!
Puke
I don't believe that buke men or women gave a rat's behind about "women's happiness." The idea was duty to husband, family, lord. Raising children, particularly sons. That's why buke women regularly studied martial arts, especially the naginata. That's why Sakura, in her youth, had classes on accounting rather than on the Confucian Classics. Not for "women's happiness" but for expertise in running a samurai household.

Back to my story: I didn't want to clobber the readers over the head with stuff about women's roles in Edo-period Japan. I just wanted to leave a few light hints. And then have fun! Very Happy
_________________
"Walk the thousand mile road, step by step" -- Miyamoto Musashi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AngusH
Castle Guard
Castle Guard
Veteran Member



Joined: 07 May 2006
Posts: 377
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Wave Tossed wrote:

Back to my story: I didn't want to clobber the readers over the head with stuff about women's roles in Edo-period Japan. I just wanted to leave a few light hints. And then have fun! Very Happy


Yeah, I think you had just the right amount. There isn't really enough room in a short story to put too much of this in without bogging it down.

Have you ever tried your hand at longer fiction in this style? I'd definately be interested in reading it if so.
_________________
"While he hears Masashige alone still lives, let him believe that he will prevail at last!"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JLBadgley
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Forum Kanrei
Forum Kanrei



Joined: 09 Apr 2007
Posts: 1617
Location: Washington, DC, USA

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
AngusH wrote:
Yeah, I think you had just the right amount.


I agree. At times I almost felt hit over the head with it, but it was a soft blow (or I have a hard head, not sure which).

A common thing in martial arts stories I noticed (I can't recall if you did this--it may be others that I read above) is the tendency to use the names of techniques to describe the action. I used to do this, myself, but I now find that it detracts from the story. For one, I have learned too many techniques with similar names (or the same technique with different names) so that it really doesn't help--and if I don't know the technique at all, I can't picture the action.

Unless your audience is familiar with the techniques in question, I think you are talking past them. I'd recommend a description, even if you had a named technique or kata in mind. Also, if I am reading something in an historical setting and I see people using specific terminology from a modern (or later period) school (e.g. if I see someone talk about 'ikkajo', 'kotegaeshi', 'unbreakable arm', and 'shiho nage', even if those are valid techniques for a koryu of the time), it pulls me out of the setting somewhat. This may be overly nitpicky, of course, but just a note.

Finally, in the 'Matsudaira Plot' I found it odd that the big challenge was that Sakura was a woman--and the fact she only had one arm and one eye seemed glossed over--almost as if she had purple hair or something. I didn't see how she overcame such physical disability; I just had to accept that she must be really really good.

You definitely left me wanting to read more, though. I'd be interested in seeing you try your hand at a longer piece. I felt you had a lot you wanted to convey, but were keeping yourself within the bounds of a short story.

-Josh
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Wave Tossed
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1698
Location: Columbia, Maryland U.S.A.

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
AngusH wrote:
Wave Tossed wrote:

Back to my story: I didn't want to clobber the readers over the head with stuff about women's roles in Edo-period Japan. I just wanted to leave a few light hints. And then have fun! Very Happy


Yeah, I think you had just the right amount. There isn't really enough room in a short story to put too much of this in without bogging it down.

Have you ever tried your hand at longer fiction in this style? I'd definately be interested in reading it if so.
I'm currently working on a novel. And guess what? Sakura is one of my main characters! Very Happy
_________________
"Walk the thousand mile road, step by step" -- Miyamoto Musashi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wave Tossed
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1698
Location: Columbia, Maryland U.S.A.

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
JLBadgley wrote:
Finally, in the 'Matsudaira Plot' I found it odd that the big challenge was that Sakura was a woman--and the fact she only had one arm and one eye seemed glossed over--almost as if she had purple hair or something. I didn't see how she overcame such physical disability; I just had to accept that she must be really really good.
My story was sort of an oblique reference to all of the Tange Sazen (the One-Eyed, One-Armed Swordsman) films. I even "stole" a couple of scenes from some of the Tange Sazen films. And of course my character's name "Tange Sakura" -- well, you can see the derivation. Very Happy

Also, there were two films made in the early 60's, called "One-Eyed, One-Armed Swordswoman." I saw the first one of these films about 15-20 years ago at a Japanese Film series. I LOVED this film. I would give my own eye and arm to get a subtitled DVD copy of these films. Just Kidding
Quote:
You definitely left me wanting to read more, though. I'd be interested in seeing you try your hand at a longer piece. I felt you had a lot you wanted to convey, but were keeping yourself within the bounds of a short story.
Don't worry, I'm working on a novel that involves Tange Sakura. And I'm planning more. In my longer works, I go on a lot more about her missing her eye and her arm. I also go into the reasons why she lost these important body parts and how she ended up being a wandering female ronin.

In reality, losing an arm and an eye would sorely handicap a person from doing any sort of kenjutsu. However, my tales all come from a lovely place called "my little corner of Chambara-Land." Cool Very Happy
_________________
"Walk the thousand mile road, step by step" -- Miyamoto Musashi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
maikeruart
Shushou
Shushou
Veteran Member
2009 Benefactor
2009 Benefactor



Joined: 07 May 2006
Posts: 870
Location: Southbridge

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
i lost 90% of the use in my right eye due to a herditary disorder. it greatly affects certain aspects of my daily life., kenjutsu was one of them it took me 3 years to get comfortable to do kumitachi on high speed.

Maikeru
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
cbubacz
Artisan
Artisan
Veteran Member



Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Posts: 100
Location: New Hampshire, USA

PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 3:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I was born with one eye. Believe me, it affects many things.

Depth perception is the primary one. But also, you learn to compensate by reading distances in terms of angles and shadows of the objects in your limited field of vision).

Also, I tend to hang my head to one side and a little low just so I can get the most out of my field of vision. I have some neck problems because of that.

I also can't see things in 3D. It just doesn't work that way. On the other hand, I am (or was) a good artist. I attruibuted part of that to being able to define perspective easier. Angles and shadows. THe world is 2D to me, so it seemss easier to translate that onto a flat page.

I've also been in a lot of car accidents. And I can be startled whren peopel come up on my blind side. I tend to liek to sit with a wall to that side.

There you go. Some food for the one-eyed character profile. lol.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
JLBadgley wrote:
A common thing in martial arts stories I noticed (I can't recall if you did this--it may be others that I read above) is the tendency to use the names of techniques to describe the action. I used to do this, myself, but I now find that it detracts from the story. For one, I have learned too many techniques with similar names (or the same technique with different names) so that it really doesn't help--and if I don't know the technique at all, I can't picture the action.

Unless your audience is familiar with the techniques in question, I think you are talking past them. I'd recommend a description, even if you had a named technique or kata in mind. Also, if I am reading something in an historical setting and I see people using specific terminology from a modern (or later period) school (e.g. if I see someone talk about 'ikkajo', 'kotegaeshi', 'unbreakable arm', and 'shiho nage', even if those are valid techniques for a koryu of the time), it pulls me out of the setting somewhat. This may be overly nitpicky, of course, but just a note.


This was a major problem for me with Matsudaira, It's a Girl, and one of the others, I can't remember. Unless you're an Iaidoka, you don't know what a "naninani" strike or something is; you're alienating the majority of your potential readership if you use things like that. Personally, I try to avoid using any Japanese altogether, except for those words that have crossed over into English like "samurai" and :ninjer". If you need a glossary for people to understand it, you probably shouldn't use it--at least in a short story.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Wave Tossed
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1698
Location: Columbia, Maryland U.S.A.

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
ltdomer98 wrote:
JLBadgley wrote:
A common thing in martial arts stories I noticed (I can't recall if you did this--it may be others that I read above) is the tendency to use the names of techniques to describe the action. I used to do this, myself, but I now find that it detracts from the story. For one, I have learned too many techniques with similar names (or the same technique with different names) so that it really doesn't help--and if I don't know the technique at all, I can't picture the action.

Unless your audience is familiar with the techniques in question, I think you are talking past them. I'd recommend a description, even if you had a named technique or kata in mind. Also, if I am reading something in an historical setting and I see people using specific terminology from a modern (or later period) school (e.g. if I see someone talk about 'ikkajo', 'kotegaeshi', 'unbreakable arm', and 'shiho nage', even if those are valid techniques for a koryu of the time), it pulls me out of the setting somewhat. This may be overly nitpicky, of course, but just a note.


This was a major problem for me with Matsudaira, It's a Girl, and one of the others, I can't remember. Unless you're an Iaidoka, you don't know what a "naninani" strike or something is; you're alienating the majority of your potential readership if you use things like that. Personally, I try to avoid using any Japanese altogether, except for those words that have crossed over into English like "samurai" and :ninjer". If you need a glossary for people to understand it, you probably shouldn't use it--at least in a short story.
I wasn't sure what to do about martial arts terminology. I remember during the first Samurai Fiction Contest that I should assume that the judges, at least, were familiar with the elements of Japanese culture and history i.e. don't have to define what a "ronin" or a "daimyo" are.

I guess I made the same assumption, perhaps erroneous, about martial arts terms. As I recall, I only made one reference to a kendo term: the chudan (middle) sword position. However, I did refer to some parts of a tachi. Again, I made the assumption (perhaps erroneous) that the judges and readers would have some knowledge about these terms.

As for the "it's a girl" thing. I'm not going to be able to please everyone. Some wanted me to make a bigger deal out of the fact that Sakura was a woman. Others thought I was making too big of a deal about this. So what to do? As Twain said, "can't please all the people all the time." Just Kidding
_________________
"Walk the thousand mile road, step by step" -- Miyamoto Musashi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kitsuno
Forum Shogun
Forum Shogun



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 9481
Location: Honolulu, HI

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Wave Tossed wrote:


As for the "it's a girl" thing. I'm not going to be able to please everyone.


"It's a Girl" was the name of another story.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Wave Tossed wrote:
As for the "it's a girl" thing. I'm not going to be able to please everyone. Some wanted me to make a bigger deal out of the fact that Sakura was a woman. Others thought I was making too big of a deal about this. So what to do? As Twain said, "can't please all the people all the time." Just Kidding


No, no, you misunderstood me. I was referring to the story "It's a Girl". Not your story. I thought it worked fine with her as a woman--that wasn't an issue for me at all.

As to the language issue--my personal opinion is that action should be described in terms understandable by the widest audience possible. It's okay to sprinkle a tiny bit in to add to the Japanese "feel" of a story, but while the judges may know the parts of a sword or kendo techniques (I don't know much about either, but I didn't judge this year), the wider audience does not. When I judged the past two years, I always took that into account. To use my story as an example, I could say that Genji heard a voice behind the byobu, but only a few people are going to know, without explaining it, that a byobu is a painted screen used to separate spaces in rooms, etc. Explaining that takes way too much time away from the actual storyline. Saying "he heard a voice from behind the byobu screen" is not only redundant, but stops the reader and makes him wonder what "byobu" means, again taking him out of the story for a moment. However, most people have at least some mental image of a screen in a Japanese room--if I just say "screen", that's likely the image which will come up, and there are no distractions.

Now, if this were an iaido/kendo forum, and you wrote a story for that audience, then I would see no problem with writing techniques or sword parts and assuming people would know it. And of course, it's your story anyways--write it how you want. Perhaps you *want* people to pause and ponder a word--it's all about what effect you are shooting for. I know there was some criticism of my story "Running" because I use the word "crap" in it, and that's not a term that would have been used by a 16th century samurai. To me, that's not the point (and of course they wouldn't say "crap", because they wouldn't be speaking in English. I could certainly see a samurai running from the enemy after a battle saying くそ! or ちくしょ!, both of which I'd translate into modern English as "crap" or something similiar. They're lucky I didn't go with my First Unneccesary Choice of Knowledge). The point is to put you inside the head of the guy running away, and feel what he feels--and I think the word choice helps towards that. Having been a judge myself, I can admit we get unnecessarily picky at times.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Wave Tossed
Tsushima no Kami
Tsushima no Kami
Veteran Member



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 1698
Location: Columbia, Maryland U.S.A.

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Oooops! Just Kidding Somehow I didn't pick up the issue that "It's A Girl" was another story in the contest. Now I remember! I read that story with interest but got confused by the plot and character development.

As for martial arts/history terms: I'll remember what you said about using martial arts and/or history terms. There are some terms I think I don't have to define in a short story i.e. "ronin." Though in a longer work, one can work in a definition of a word like "ronin" into your general course of action. As for kenjutsu/kendo terms, I probably didn't have to use "chudan" but just work into the narative a description of the fighter's sword position. I'll remember that for the future.

As for the description of the tachi, I probably could have used general terminogy about how beautiful and well-appointed the heirloom sword was. As I recall, I did define what a "tachi" was, as this definition was integral to the course of the story.

Thanks for your comments. You probably need to do the re-working of your other story (the one that didn't win) because it does have potential.
_________________
"Walk the thousand mile road, step by step" -- Miyamoto Musashi
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Wave Tossed wrote:
There are some terms I think I don't have to define in a short story i.e. "ronin."


Completely agree--it's common enough that most people reading would understand it.


Quote:
As for the description of the tachi, I probably could have used general terminogy about how beautiful and well-appointed the heirloom sword was. As I recall, I did define what a "tachi" was, as this definition was integral to the course of the story.


Honestly, I can't remember whose story it was--I think "It's A Girl" was way overboard with the martial arts speak and sword stuff, much more than yours was--and if I recall correctly, the "Snow Light" story was guilty of that as well. The other pitfall of working in Japanese phrases is that you might not use them correctly (see Clavell, James) and it just throws everything off. The "Yuki Akari" from "Snow Light" just sounded off-kilter to me, and bothered me the whole story when I read it.

[/quote]Thanks for your comments. You probably need to do the re-working of your other story (the one that didn't win) because it does have potential.[/quote]

Thanks--I did rework the "Intruder", don't know if Kitsuno has updated it yet. I'll get to the other one eventually, but right now I've got way too much going on.
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kitsuno
Forum Shogun
Forum Shogun



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 9481
Location: Honolulu, HI

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
ltdomer98 wrote:


Thanks--I did rework the "Intruder", don't know if Kitsuno has updated it yet. I'll get to the other one eventually, but right now I've got way too much going on.


Not yet, I'm pretty busy, but hopefuly by the end of the week.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
cbubacz
Artisan
Artisan
Veteran Member



Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Posts: 100
Location: New Hampshire, USA

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'd liek to add to the "martial arts terminology versus descriptions" discussion.

I enjoy learning new things in my reading. In some cases I've read stories that describe a movement or technique in physical terminology and later reference that technique by a name (especially if it is central to a martial art style or a character's regular repertoire).

One example is the iaijustu technique of [i]chiburi[/b] where the user flicks blood from his blade. Describe the technique and the effect. Maybe the next time it is used, mention the name of the technique. Then start using the name of the technique.

Granted, this doesn;'t work so well in short story format, but its the same way that, by reading SHOGUN, one learns a bunch of Japanese words just by context and the way they are repeatedly used.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
ltdomer98
Daijo Daijin
Daijo Daijin
Veteran Member



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 5456
Location: Washington (the one with all the politicians)

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
cbubacz wrote:
Granted, this doesn;'t work so well in short story format, but its the same way that, by reading SHOGUN, one learns a bunch of Japanese words just by context and the way they are repeatedly used.


One learns a lot of horribly BAD, completely INCORRECT Japanese from Shogun... Rolling Eyes
_________________
Bring it on, laddie 'Domer
The Sengoku Field Manual Blog
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Post new topic   Reply to topic    The Samurai Archives Citadel Forum Index // Oshirase All times are GMT - 10 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Help the Samurai Archives




alexisRed v1.2 // Theme Created By: Andrew Charron // Samuraized By: Aaron Rister

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group