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kikuchiyo
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'm currently training in Kyokushin Karate and considering taking Aikido and Kendo/Kenjutsu when my body isn't so damned sore from Karate class.
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msr.iaidoka
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
kikushiyo,

Correct me if I am wrong, but is Kyokushin the style founded by Mas Oyama?


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kikuchiyo
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
msr.iaidoka wrote:
kikushiyo,

Correct me if I am wrong, but is Kyokushin the style founded by Mas Oyama?


平和,

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Yes you are right, Kyokushin is the style founded by Sosai Oyama. It's brutal man but I love it.
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msr.iaidoka
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
kikuchiyo,

Good deal. I have a ton of respect for Oyama sensei. Any man who can take down a bovine with one punch to the head is as tough as they can be.


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Mori
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 3:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Hi, been doing kendo for almost 3 years, I also study Hyoho Niten Ichi Ryu (HNIR) and some jitte\jutte techniques Smile
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msr.iaidoka
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Mori,

Welcome to the forum. I think you are the first Niten Ichi Ryuuka to sign up.


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rikoseishin
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Welcome!

Its nice to have another koryu practitioner here, and such a famous ryu at that Very Happy
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jdmcowan
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
For almost a year and a half, I have been studying and practicing Shinbukan Kuroda Ryugi, including Komagawa Kaishin-ryu Kenjutsu and Shishin Takuma-ryu Jujutsu. I have not started learning any of the other ryu in the system, yet. I go to my next seminar with Kuroda sensei at the end of the month. I'm guessing that I will learn the first Tamiya-ryu Iaijutsu kata there, though I'm pretty sure I'm not ready for it yet.

I also started studying and practicing Aikido very shortly after beginning with Kuroda sensei. My sensei in Aikido is Meido Moore sensei - formerly shihandai under Tenzan (Fumio) Toyoda Sensei, but now teaches under authority (shidoin) from T.K. Chiba Shihan. We include ken and jo in our study and practice of aikido.

About 6 months ago, I also began studying and practicing ANKF kyudo with Takako Matsui Swain Renshi.

jieremi


Last edited by jdmcowan on Sun Mar 04, 2007 4:32 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Bushikan
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I assume you also study Meshi-ha Mugai Ryu Iai Hyodo. I had an opportunity to watch a class in Nishi-Shinjuku got to do some tamashigiri, practically taught and practiced. While I don't remember the instructors name he is very good.

regards
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jdmcowan
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Bushikan wrote:
I assume you also study Meshi-ha Mugai Ryu Iai Hyodo.


I do not. As I understand it, the powers that be within Mugai Ryu highly respect the Kuroda Ryugi, but expect you to focus on their ryu and do not approve of a member studying both at the same time.

I have done some battodo and had some tameshigiri practice through that, but I'm spread pretty thin already and can't devote serious time to the additional art.

jieremi


Last edited by jdmcowan on Mon Mar 05, 2007 2:33 am; edited 1 time in total
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Bushikan
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 6:01 pm    Post subject: sense Reply with quote
That makes sense. Each art has its philosophy and approach to combat, to train in another style while deticated to another will take you further away from the principles and techniques of that style. I was thinking of possibly one day taking up a koryu jujutsu ryu-ha, however the one I'm intersted in have thier own sword techniques and would conflict with SMRK and SMR-MSRI. Namely Takenouchi Ryu Jujutsu.
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Algren-san
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Does anybody know any good Japanese martial arts schools in the Pittsburgh area particularily any form of Kenjutsu or Iaido.
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ukadept
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2007 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I've studied Bujinkan now for 10 years.
Done some Judo and Shotokan karate when I was a teenager.
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niitsu kakunoshin
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2007 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
ukadept wrote:
I've studied Bujinkan now for 10 years.
Done some Judo and Shotokan karate when I was a teenager.


I study at the Bujinkan as well. Smile I have also done several other martial arts. I have over ten years experience in traditional Chinese martial arts as well.
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ukadept
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 4:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Yeah. I've found that training in the Bujinkan suits me better than any other martial art. That's why I've stuck with it.[/quote]
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niitsu kakunoshin
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 7:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
ukadept wrote:
Yeah. I've found that training in the Bujinkan suits me better than any other martial art. That's why I've stuck with it.
[/quote]

I like the Bujinkan for several reasons. One, my dojo has a good atmosphere with many skilled students that have been training as long or longer than me. Plus, my dojo is 5 mins from my house. Smile ...oh yeah, and the martial arts of the Bujinkan aren't half bad. Cool
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Dr.Mavashi
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Well I started with Okinawan Shorin Ryu/Kobayashi Ryu when I was a kid, from 14 to 18.
Then, when the instructor left San Fran I bounced around, tooke years off, did some freestyle wrestling, did Shootfighting for about a year. Then, in 1999 I've joined Enshin Karate an off shoot of earlier mentioned Kyokushin Karate. And that's my thing pretty much, Enshin/Ashihara type of movent and tactical/technical model. I love everything that has the Combat texture to it, did Kenjitsu, would be getting more into it, and love Tanto, really wanna make that my "minor" if you will.

OSU !!!
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msr.iaidoka
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Dr.Mavashi,

Do you particularly prefer tantojutsu or do you just want a combative knife style?


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Dr.Mavashi
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
msr.iaidoka,

Well .... ideally I would like a Tantojuitsu that is practiced for combative application - combat, Applegate/Fairbrain system for example is bit unnatural for me because the theory and modeling behind movement is completely different from my second nature, Karate-like way of moving. I believe in full speed/full power sparring as in essential part of training as well ... so I guess I want the best of both worlds.
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msr.iaidoka
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Dr.Mavashi,

A karatedou style application would not really fit with the nature of combative blade work. The only karatedou that I know that would fit in would be Uechi Ryuu due to its fluidity. Most other karatedou come off as "harder" styles.
If I understand you correctly you are looking primarily for combative application. My recommendation is that you look for a Filipino or other southeast Asian system; eskrima, kali, arnis, silat, etc. They definitely partake in combative realism training.


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Dr.Mavashi
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
msr.iaidoka,
You are not familiar with Enshin/Ashihara Karate, we are neither hard or soft, we are not traditional, here is what we move like:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QSQ3VDsvo8&mode=related&search=
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WuXLn7YhZg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_CcTbCQpuk&mode=related&search=
I've looked at philipino styles, I believe the are not optimized for minimum movement as japanese styles are. And they would be too alien for me on movement basis.
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msr.iaidoka
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Dr.Mavashi,

You are right, I am not familiar with your style which is why I said "most" and not "all." Smile
I am not able to find a good video on the Filipino knife-based styles that I am familiar with. Most of the videos on YouTube are ugly.
Optimization of movement with a blade is a different animal than optimization for empty handed techniques. Same goes for optimization for a longer weapon such as a machete, sword, or long staff.
As for the movements being alien, that is half the fun of cross-training. My world was turned upside-down when I started studying sword work. Once I got comfortable and was able to adapt it with my previous Japanese juujutsu training I added Filipino blade work. They all move differently, but they all need to. If I were to try to work a knife with just my juujutsu background I would be far from effective.
Please bear in mind that I am not calling your style ineffective, I am just relating my own experiences and opinions.


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Dr.Mavashi
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Well, I dissagree. I believe that everything should have a foundation that ties things together. I've taken Kenjitsu/Tanto jitsu very briefly, and I've found that:
1) My "grid" of movement is very close conceptually to the basics of movement behind short blade/long blade.
2) It was transperent to me that weather it is a Katana or Wakizashi or Tanto, things change but once you learn one the other comes as a tune-in-default of sorts, they are different but they are much more similar than different, because they have one conseptual foundation, foudational basics of trajectories, footwork, etc.
3)I believe in minimum of mascular effort/amount of movements for maximum impact on delivery. And I believe that only japanese martial arts achieve that. In observations, philipino arts arent optimized as mentioned above. They have some extra movement and some non-optimized vectors(from the basic physics stand point)of cuts.

I think mixing of such things as Karate with Boxing, or Judo with Tae Kwon Do for example is entirely infective. Such difference in basics can not have effective transition from one to another in realtime combat, on consistant basis.
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msr.iaidoka
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Dr.Mavashi,

The basics of how to move and what angles are optimal to attack from are, in most combat-based styles, the same. The styles that focus more on the art tend to be the ones that differ. Granted, they do have their reasons for doing such, but that is a topic for another time.
Styles based in the same culture will, of course, have similar logic bases and techniques. When you work with a different culture then the style changes. A saber would not be used the same way as a katana or a rapier due to the design of the weapon. One may indeed help you learn another but it may also hinder you if the differences are not stressed. For long weapons, since laws prohibit us from walking out with swords or similar weapons in public, then a varied education is not a bad idea since you never know what you can lay your hands on.
Smaller weapons like knives tend to be more forgiving when it comes to stylistic differences due to the minimal ways the design differs. And, since laws do allow us to carry certain knives in public, finding a style that matches the blade (rather than a blade that matches the style) is ideal.
For empty-handed theory, different styles stress different situations. Some stress kicking and anti-kicking, other stress limb manipulation, and others stress body conditioning. Alone each is effective and can be used effectively. Combined they provide the user with a far larger toolbox to draw from. The basics vary just as they do from person to person. 100 people trained by the same teacher will do techniques differently, if only slightly. As such, the styles of today do not match the styles of years past. This is not necessarily a bad thing as it proves the organic nature of combative systems. This human influence on the techniques is what allows "odd" combinations to fit together with an individual combatant. It just takes work.
Out of curiosity, since I teach Filipino knife work, what are your observations about extra movement and suboptimal cut vectors?


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Dr.Mavashi
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 07, 2007 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Well, you know, if you throw a straight punch and your elbow goes up(elbow tip not pointing to the floor but at 45 degree angle or parallel to the floor.) Your punch, in respect to its hitting surface, does not have a unified direction of movement, but has several due to the derection of an elbow extenyopm being a sort of perpendicular to the straight forward direction of a forearm. I see that in philipino stuff. Now, I know you don't need this type of force-behind-the-cut maximization in an unarmored knife fight, but I want my cuts optimized, besides other primery reasons I have mentioned.
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