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Dash101
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2009 5:26 am    Post subject: Tales of Old Japan Reply with quote
http://ia331340.us.archive.org/1/items/talesofoldjapan13015gut/13015-h/13015-h.htm

Published in 1871 (possibly re-published in 1910) the Tales of Old Japan is an interesting collection of short stories written by Lord Redesdale. I am not familiar with the author but the publication indicates he was formerly the second secretary to the British Legation in Japan).

It's an interesting collection of short stories which include a story of the Forty Seven Ronnins, a series of fairy tales and some stories concerning famous Japanese superstitions.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2009 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Editions are still being published, at least up thru '05 with probably a couple of extra runs since then. I picked up a new copy at a bookstore earlier this year and have been reading it on and off while commuting to work and such. And by the way, Lord Redesdale is more commonly known as AB Mitford. Wink He served in the British legation in Japan sometime in the 1860s up through part of the 1870s. He was chummy with Ernest Satow.

I much prefer reading a real book rather than from my PC or smart phone. Laughing
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Dash101
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2009 6:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
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Lord Redesdale is more commonly known as AB Mitford. He served in the British legation in Japan sometime in the 1860s up through part of the 1870s. He was chummy with Ernest Satow.


AH! I see. I did not know that. I just looked it up and in fact there are later editions of Tales of Japan that include his full name as Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford Redesdale.

Quote:
I much prefer reading a real book rather than from my PC or smart phone


I too prefer a hard copy in my hands but I find during hectic days of travel that the less I have in my shoulder bag the better. Reading these publications on my blackberry has actually been enjoyable. But nothing replaces the real thing.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 4:33 am    Post subject: Re: Tales of Old Japan Reply with quote
Dash101 wrote:
http://ia331340.us.archive.org/1/items/talesofoldjapan13015gut/13015-h/13015-h.htm

Published in 1871 (possibly re-published in 1910) the Tales of Old Japan is an interesting collection of short stories written by Lord Redesdale. I am not familiar with the author but the publication indicates he was formerly the second secretary to the British Legation in Japan).

It's an interesting collection of short stories which include a story of the Forty Seven Ronnins, a series of fairy tales and some stories concerning famous Japanese superstitions.

I downloaded this from the archive.org site a long time back, but I haven't gotten a chance to read it yet. Like both of you, I prefer hard copy but sometimes have to settle for e-copy. I also don't have those little handheld convenience devices that seem to be so necessary for city dwellers but not so here in the middle of nowhere. We even have to move to certain areas on the property or around the house in order to get a cellphone signal (not that I have a cellphone). But even I, a Luddite by default, have a large collection of stuff downloaded from archive.org that someday I hope to read. So, Dash, is this one worth moving up the queue? Smile
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 4:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
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But even I, a Luddite by default, have a large collection of stuff downloaded from archive.org that someday I hope to read. So, Dash, is this one worth moving up the queue?


No matter how fast I read, my reading list only gets longer and longer.
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Dash101
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
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But even I, a Luddite by default, have a large collection of stuff downloaded from archive.org that someday I hope to read. So, Dash, is this one worth moving up the queue?


To be honest, I think it is for the sole reason that it's really a collection of short stories of moral tales. So you have the option to read a story start to end that is really only 16 pages or so. And it's easy to put down and come back to. Some of the fair tales are quite interesting to boot and reveal an interesting cultural view of the time.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Dash101 wrote:


To be honest, I think it is for the sole reason that it's really a collection of short stories of moral tales. So you have the option to read a story start to end that is really only 16 pages or so. And it's easy to put down and come back to. Some of the fair tales are quite interesting to boot and reveal an interesting cultural view of the time.
You make a good point here, Dash. Lately, my reading has of necessity encompassed small sessions, wherein 16 pages is a fair average of what I have time for in the evening. Currently, I am perusing Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramhansa Yogananda, interspersed with yet more of Before the Dawn (no, I haven't finished it yet!) and various articles and chapters from Totman's Early Modern Japan text. A typically confused reading list, typically (for me) read all at the same time. It shouldn't be a problem to slip in a few short stories in there somewhere... Laughing
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I picked up a copy of this a few years ago, and though it's not mentioned specifically, perusing the segments about tanuki reminded of the stories of them taking money, etc. and replacing them with leaves. That in turn reminded me of a pleasant anecdote I think you all might enjoy:

I work at a school teaching DD kids. In my class we've got kids ranging in age from 7-11 at the moment. One of them I first met a couple years ago when he started at the school in another classroom. He's AWESOME! A lot of fun and very hammy (he will re-enact ENTIRE Disney, etc., movies in front of the TV screen as they play, verbatim). Every time I saw him he'd point at me, scream something (at the time) incoherent, and run away to hide, playfully. I eventually learned from one of the teachers in his room that what he was yelling was "Shredder!", the TMNT villain, and that he apparently was under the impression that I was him (we look SO much alike!). I told that teacher that I thought that may well have been one of the all-time best compliments I have ever received in my life! Anyway, eventually he came to my class and we have lots of fun. I carry a water bottle pretty much everywhere I go to keep nice and hydrated. One day, last fall, the whole class was out on the playground and I was sitting off to the side, keeping an eye on things, with my bottle sitting nearby. He "snuck up" (I use quotes because his "sneaking" is very obvious and exaggerated, cartoon-style) behind me, grabbed my bottle, put a fallen leaf where it had been, and ran off with it to hide it. Just like tanuki legends and it totally made my day. I was practically in tears I was laughing so hard (and while the other teachers could see some humor in it, they had no idea why I would find it THAT funny). Anyway, he still does it from time to time; but, fortunately, he doesn't share many other tanuki traits...
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