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Tokugawa and Confucius

 
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rikoseishin
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2006 5:51 pm    Post subject: Tokugawa and Confucius Reply with quote
Some of you may have saw my post in The Shinto/ Buddhism section obout a rise in Neo- Confuianism, well it reminded me of a subject that I would like to address. Rather, I would like everyone else to address it first.

I would like to starta discussion as to the effects of Ieyasu's incoporation of the above said ideals into the bakufu. Was it a good move, or bad? What parts of the Edo period did it effect and how so? Who did it effect? And so forth and so on.

My goal is to merely atart a conversation here that has yet to come up, at least not that I have seen anyway Cool
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Tsushima no Kami
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'd love this discussion. I've been studying some of the works of Confucius myself. And comparing what he wrote (back in the 5th century B.C.) to what some of the Tokugawa-era Japanese scholars wrote. Let me get my thoughts together and then I'll be able to contribute more. This is a complex topic.
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rikoseishin
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 7:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I know its complex, thats why its fun Very Happy

I am actually going to have to rethink my thouhgts as well, I had done research on this subject a while back, but I have forgoten most of it. So this will be a good review for me as well.

Looking forward to your comments.
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-Yamaoka Tesshu

Jonah Matheson
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AJBryant
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
What's interesting is to read some of the mid-to-late Tokugawa Confucian scholars, who were starting to look at the bakufu as wrong because it wasn't properly Confucian.

In a philosophy where Rulers must rule and Ministers must serve the ruler, the upside-down system where the shogun (= minister of the crown) ruled and the emperor (=ruler) was not allowed to follow his ordained duty of ruling, there were bound to be problems. The very philosophy the bakufu espoused served as witness against it.

Miyaji Haruki was horrified that the bakufu proclaimed only a 5-day moratorium on celebrations on the death of Emperor Momozono, while fifty days was the standard when a shogun died (Iemitsu had 70, and after Yoshimune it was 100!). When the head of one of the gosanke died, it was a 7-day moratorium.

I suggest reading people like Yamaga Soko, Yamazaki Ansai, etc.


Tony
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rikoseishin
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
Thanks Tony.

Seeing as this has kind of stagnated I will try and kick start it again.

One of the main influencers on Ieyasu, and bringing Neo Confucianism to the for front in the bakufu was Fujiwara Seika. However, it is interesting to note that he saw trade as something Japan was, and did not need to be, lacking in. This is odd becasue Confucianism sees the health and wellness of a culture to be directly related to its agrarian society.
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"The end of our Way of the sword is to be fearless when confronting our inner enemies and our outer enemies."
-Yamaoka Tesshu

Jonah Matheson
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